Posts Tagged ‘Punk’

The Boston, MA based punk band the Dropkick Murphys seem to be on an unrelenting tour schedule these days. They just finished their “Road to St. Patty’s Day” tour, and they are already making plans to go out again later this Spring. Some tickets for tour dates have already gone on sale, but the remainder will be on sale starting March 22 and 23. The tour begins in George, WA at the Sasquatch Music Festival on May 26 before heading across the U.S.

Current tour dates are as follows:

04/04/13 – Rialto Theatre in Tucson, AZ
04/06/13 – The Republik in Honolulu, HI
04/13/13 – Coachella Festival in Indio, CA
04/14/13 – Freeborn Hall in Davis, CA
04/15/13 – The Catalyst in Santa Cruz, CA
04/16/13 – The Warfield in San Francisco, CA
04/17/13 – Club Nokia in Los Angeles, CA
04/20/13 – Coachella Festival in Indio, CA
05/26/13 – Sasquatch Music Festival in George, WA
05/27/13 – Knitting Factory in Boise, ID
05/28/13 – In The Venue in Salt Lake City, UT
05/29/13 – Fillmore in Denver, CO
05/30/13 – Sunshine Theatre in Albuquerque, NM
06/01/13 – Diamond Ballroom in Oklahoma City, OK
06/02/13 – Minglewood Hall in Memphis, TN
06/03/13 – Track 29 in Chattanooga, TN
06/04/13 – The Ritz in Raleigh, NC
06/06/13 – Marathon Music Works in Nashville, TN
06/07/13 – Bogart’s in Cincinnati, OH
06/08/13 – Orion Music Fest in Detroit, MI
06/09/13 – LC Pavilion in Columbus, OH
06/11/13 – Sherman Theater in Stroudsburg, PA
06/12/13 – Paramount Theater in Huntington, NY
06/13/13 – Upstate Concert Hall in Clifton Park, NY
06/14/13 – Amnesia Rockfest in Montebello, QC
06/15/13 – Echo Beach at Molson Candian Amphitheatre in Toronto, ON

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NOFX continue to blaze through their set and keep the crowd moving with “Murder The Government” and “It’s My Job To Keep Punk Rock Elite” at Ace of Spades in Sacramento, CA on 12/10/12.

It’s probably no secret that one of my favorite bands is NOFX. I try to get to their shows whenever they are playing in the San Francisco Bay Area. Back in January, I got to go see them for their two night run at the Fillmore with Old Man Markley, No Use For A Name, and Lagwagon. It was a great two nights, but the second night was probably the crazier of the two. On the second night, there was an incident now known as “Melvingate.”

Halfway thorough “I’m Telling TimEric Melvin was tackled by a drunk fan who made a very quick retreat into the crowd. Melvin soon followed with a jump after the guy. The greatest thing was that I just happened to catch it all on video. In fact, I caught the whole show on video. Instead of telling you all about it, why don’t you just come with me in my time machine back to the show!

You can check out the whole show at the following link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsg5oMlpk_c&list=PLF6A473207F2BCFC8&feature=plpp_play_all
or you can check out any of the individual videos from the show below.

Now, let’s go to Punk Rock show, kids!!

Of course, the show starts off with regular banter, but Hefe also gets a demo CD from a guy in the crowd who was there both nights. A guy they named, Gallagher, because he looked similar to the comedian.
Right into “60%,” Fat Mike is hit directly in the fact with a drink. Not cool, and the band asks for the crowd to turn in the culprit for $100. The show had a lot of energy and it was hard to stand still so the shot is pretty shaky.

Running through their set with “Murder The Government,” “I’m Telling Tim,” and “It’s My Job To Keep Punk Rock Elite.” Everything seemed to be going well until Eric Melvin gets tackled on stage at the beginning of “I’m Telling Tim.” He gets up and stage dives after the guy into the crowd where he is joined by Fat Mike and some of the Fat crew.

“Leaving Jesusland.”

“Totally Fucked.”

Playing “black music played by whites and Mexicans,” or “Eat The Meek.”

“Seeing Double At The Triple Rock.”

About 1/3 done with their set. Although they state that this show is definitely in their top 800 played, they do screw up the start to “Mattersville.”

“Fuck The Kids Revisited” and “Linoleum,” and you get to find out what snowballing is if you did not already know!

A guy gets up on stage and tries to take pictures, but is very quickly rushed off during “Wore Out The Soles Of My Party Boots.”

“The Moron Brothers.” Appropriately enough, the guy in front decides to be an ass and give people the bird.

Here, they change the name of the song a little from “Arming The Proletariat With Potato Guns” to “Arming Puerto Ricans With Potato Guns.”

“Reeko.”

“Blasphemy (The Victimless Crime).” They also call out a guy in the crowd, calling him Dave Mustaine.

Here, they screw up the start of “The Malachi Crunch,” but then they nail it in true NOFX style.

Finishing up their set with “The Separation Of Church And Skate.”

Starting their encore with “Doornails.” They also unveil their second night banner!

“Stickin’ In My Eye.”

“Don’t Call Me White.”

Continuing through their encore with “I Wanna Be An Alcoholic” and “Fuck The Kids.”

And, finishing up with show with “Kill All The White Man.”

Hope you enjoyed the show!!

Lookout Records LogoOh no! Say it isn’t so!! It seems that Lookout! Records is no more.

Definitely a seminal part of my musical upbringing, Lookout! guided the way through my introduction to the punk scene. Starting off with the early days of Operation Ivy, I was hooked with the focused fervor of teenage angst. I listened to a lot of Lookout!’s catalog including Green Day, Operation Ivy, Crimpshrine, Rancid, American Steel, CommuniqueThe DonnasSamiam, Tilt, and more. Sadly though, Lookout! has had to totally close its doors and even cease its digital catalog due to financial issues. News of the closure was confirmed on Ted Leo and the Pharmacists‘ webite recently. Even more recently, owner/president Chris Appelgren released the following statement on the Lookout! website:

“Hard to say goodbye

I’m not sure exactly where exactly to start but I guess it’s best to get the hard part out of the way. To put it simply, what was mentioned recently on Ted Leo’s website (and reported in by a number of other outlets online) is true. Lookout Records will be closing its doors over the next few months. Most people that are reading this know that the label stopped releasing material towards the end of 2005. It was then that Lookout ended its long relationships with Green Day, Operation Ivy and a few other artists. That development meant significantly scaling down the business, which included letting the staff go and moving from the label’s Berkeley headquarters and warehouse into a small office. It was a challenging time for everyone involved – bands, staff, and business partners. For myself and the other two owners at the time, Cathy and Molly, we resolved to put our limited resources into rectifying some of the issues and problems that had been Lookout’s undoing, return to a modest operation, with the hopes of first, getting things back on track, and hopefully doing more in the future.

To many, that would have been the perfect time to wind things up with Lookout Records, but we decided not to. Sure, sales were down across the board and Lookout no longer had many of its long-standing top sellers in its catalog. There were artists that were committed to sticking with the label and shared our hope of fixing the problems and being able to find our way through a difficult period and create new successes. This was the inspiration we needed and over the next few years, with hard work we were able to simplify label operations to a large extent. With the help of folks like Ali, Andy, and later, Spenser pitching in, we focused on playing catch-up and on top of new developments.It wasn’t easy to keep catalog items in print and that became especially challenging when our primary compact disc manufacturer and our distribution partner Lumberjack-Mordam went out of business unexpectedly. Having our physical distributor and a manufacturer go belly up disrupted our sales, meant a significant loss of income, and caused inventory and accounting problems. The next year when our mail order partner, Little Type, went out of business, Lookout was also dealt another significant blow. We did our best to resolve the issued caused by these developments but both ultimately amounted to a lot more work and severely impacted income.By this time, it was primarily Cathy and myself overseeing Lookout’s business. This was done in whatever spare time we could find, as both of us had other jobs. Molly had minimized her involvement with the label, remaining a valued and trusted adviser. The label’s sole employee was Spenser, who came in to our small office space in Oakland to handle day to day stuff a couple times a week.Last summer, we began tentatively discussing what it might mean to let Lookout end. It was a strange and scary to talk about at first and hard for either of us to imagine what it would be like. Lookout Records had been part of my life for over 20 years and Cathy is a label veteran with over 15 years of experience at Lookout. We considered all options but kept coming back to realization that the best use of our energies would be to shut the doors once and for all – for the legacy of the label, for the bands, and for benefit of the relationships and friendships with artists, partners, and stakeholders. After some soul searching, hat’s what we decided to do.Right now, we are in the process of going through years and years of archives and figuring out what to do with things that have no obvious home.  Inventory, masters, artwork – that’s all going back to the artists. We’ve talked to some bands but not all of them. If you were in a band and haven’t heard from Cathy or myself, definitely get in touch. Our efforts to close out Lookout’s remaining business reflect the same intentions we’ve had for the past few years – to do the best we can by the bands. It’s our hope that this could be an opportunity for the artists themselves to revisit their Lookout releases, with interesting and cool results. It’s time to let Lookout Records really and truly become history.Thank you. Thanks for listening to the music, going to shows, coming in our store, forming bands, sending us demos, buying records from our mail order, signing to our label, wearing a t-shirt, playing our records on your radio show, putting us up on your living room floor, writing fan mail, interviewing us for your zine, putting on a show, for inspiring us, for being inspired by Lookout, for your hard work, for just being there, and for ALL of the memories (there are so many). Thank you. Here’s to you, and to whatever comes next…

Thanks, Chris

P.S. We’ll continue to update this site from time to time, with stories, information or anything cool that we come across that seems worth sharing. You’re welcome to come back and visit.”

Lookout! co-founder Larry Livermore also Tweeted on Friday,

“Requiem for a dream? Or just time to say goodbye to something that really ended a long time ago?”

Sad days, but we’ll keep checking back on their website for any more updates.

Love you guys, Lookout!!